The Ledes

Friday, November 27, 2015.

AP: "Malian special forces have arrested two men over last week's attack on a luxury hotel in the capital that killed 19 people, according to a statement distributed Friday morning. The statement identified the two Malians, both arrested in Bamako, but provided no other details on their background or their potential roles in the attack."

The Wires

Weekly Address

The President's Weekly Address

Nearly four centuries after the Mayflower set sail, the world is still full of pilgrims – men and women who want nothing more than the chance for a safer, better future for themselves and their families, What makes America America is that we offer that chance. -- President Obama
White House: "In this week's address, the President wished everyone a happy Thanksgiving, and reflected on America’s history of welcoming men and women seeking a safer, better future for themselves and their families":

The Ledes

Thursday, November 26, 2015.

Guardian: "Sex abuse allegations against priests at St John’s Abbey in Minnesota were revealed in stark detail on Tuesday with the release of confidential documents concerning five priests accused of child sex abuse."

Reuters: "A 23-year-old Indiana man has pleaded guilty to breaking into a medical museum and stealing preserved human brains that he then sold online. David Charles, of Indianapolis, pleaded guilty to six charges including receiving stolen property and burglary in a Marion county court. Magistrate Amy Barbar sentenced him to one year of home detention and two years of probation, county prosecutor spokesman Anthony Deer said."

White House Live Video
November 27

11:00 am ET: Michelle Obama accepts delivery of the White House Christmas tree

Go to


Domenico Montanaro of NPR with everything you never wanted to know about the strange tradition of presidential "pardons" of turkeys.

Frank Rich reviews "Carol," the film based on Patricia Highsmith's 1952 novel The Price of Salt, published under a pseudonym. As usual, Rich goes deep.

New York Times: "Ta-Nehisi Coates won the National Book Award for nonfiction Wednesday[, Nov. 18,] night for “Between the World and Me,” a visceral, blunt exploration of his experience of being a black man in America, which was published this summer in the middle of a national dialogue about race relations and inequality.... The fiction award went to Adam Johnson for 'Fortune Smiles.'..."

Slate: Carly Simon told People magazine that "You're So Vain" is about Warren Beatty. CW: Somehow I think I knew that a long time ago.

Guardian: "Gawker, the gossip website..., is giving up on reporting gossip in order to refocus on politics and 'to hump the [2016 presidential] campaign'. The site, founded by British journalist Nick Denton in 2003, announced on Tuesday that Gawker was steering in a new direction that would “orient its editorial scope on political news, commentary and satire'.”

Washington Post: Actor "Charlie Sheen confirmed on Tuesday that he is HIV-positive, as rumored in recent days by an onslaught of tabloid stories. Sheen told Matt Lauer on the 'Today' show that he is going public with his illness for multiple reasons, including that he’s been blackmailed for upwards of $10 million since he was diagnosed four years ago."

Public Service Announcement

Washington Post (October 26): "A research division of the World Health Organization announced on Monday that bacon, sausage and other processed meats cause cancer, and that red meat probably does, too. The report by the influential group stakes out one of the most aggressive stances against meat yet taken by a major health organization, and it is expected to face stiff criticism in the United States."

New York Times (October 20: "The American Cancer Society, which has for years taken the most aggressive approach to [breast-cancer] screening, issued new guidelines on Tuesday, recommending that women with an average risk of breast cancer start having mammograms at 45 and continue once a year until 54, then every other year for as long as they are healthy and likely to live another 10 years. The organization also said it no longer recommended clinical breast exams, in which doctors or nurses feel for lumps, for women of any age who have had no symptoms of abnormality in the breasts."

... For about $880,000, you can purchase Julia Child's excellent little house in Provence; her kitchen is intact, except for the stove.

New York Times: "Archaeologists have over the years cataloged the rocks [forming Stonehenge], divined meaning from their placement — lined up for midsummer sunrise and midwinter sunset — and studied animal and human bones buried there. They have also long known about the other monuments — burial chambers, a 130-foot-tall mound of chalk known as Silbury Hill and many other circular structures. An aerial survey in 1925 revealed circles of timbers, now called Woodhenge, two miles from Stonehenge." With slide show.


New York Times: "In an overheated art market where anything seems possible, a painting of an outstretched nude woman by the early-20th-century artist Amedeo Modigliani sold on Monday night for $170.4 million with fees, in a packed sales room at Christie’s. It was the second-highest price paid for an artwork at auction."

Artist's rendering of the main exhibition hall of the planned wing of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. CLICK ON PICTURE TO SEE LARGER IMAGE.New York Times: "In designing its $325 million addition on Columbus Avenue, the American Museum of Natural History has opted for an architectural concept that is both cautious and audacious, according to plans approved by its board on Wednesday. The design ... evokes Frank Gehry’s museum in Bilbao, Spain, in its undulating exterior and Turkey’s underground city of Cappadocia in its cavelike interior. The design, by the architect Jeanne Gang for the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation, aims to unite the museum’s various activities, solve its notorious circulation problems and provide a multistory showcase for the institution’s expanding role as a hub for scientific research and scholarship.”

New York Times: "... Jon Stewart has signed a production deal with the premium cable channel HBO, the channel announced on Tuesday. As part of the arrangement, Mr. Stewart will work on some digital short projects that are expected to appear on HBO’s apps like HBO Now and HBO Go. Mr. Stewart could also pursue movie or television projects with the network. The contract covers four years."

Guardian: "Facebook has announced plans to water down its controversial 'real names' policy, after lobbying from civil liberties groups worldwide."

If you'd like to know whatever happened to former NYT food columnist Mark Bittman, the Washington Post has the answer.

Jennifer Senior of the New York Times reviews Notorious R.G.B., by Irin Carmon & Shana Knizhnik: "It’s an artisanal hagiography, a frank and admiring piece of fan nonfiction."

Digital Globe photo, via NASA, republished in the New York Times. CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE LARGER IMAGE.... New York Times: "Satellite pictures of a remote and treeless northern steppe reveal colossal earthworks — geometric figures of squares, crosses, lines and rings the size of several football fields, recognizable only from the air and the oldest estimated at 8,000 years old. The largest, near a Neolithic settlement, is a giant square of 101 raised mounds, its opposite corners connected by a diagonal cross, covering more terrain than the Great Pyramid of Cheops.... Described last year at an archaeology conference in Istanbul as unique and previously unstudied, the earthworks, in the Turgai region of northern Kazakhstan, number at least 260 — mounds, trenches and ramparts — arrayed in five basic shapes."

New York Times: "In a landmark study, scientists at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands reported that they had conducted an experiment that they say proved one of the most fundamental claims of quantum theory — that objects separated by great distance can instantaneously affect each other’s behavior. The finding is another blow to one of the bedrock principles of standard physics known as 'locality,' which states that an object is directly influenced only by its immediate surroundings. The Delft study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, lends further credence to an idea that Einstein famously rejected. He said quantum theory necessitated 'spooky action at a distance,' and he refused to accept the notion that the universe could behave in such a strange and apparently random fashion." CW: Everything is relative, Al.

Gizmodo: On Halloween, "a rather large asteroid — discovered less than three weeks ago — is set to to fly past the Earth at a distance not seen in nearly a decade.... NASA says that 2015 TB145 will safely pass by the Earth and continue to following along its exceptionally eccentric and high-inclination orbit — which may explain why it wasn’t discovered until only a few weeks ago. During the flyby, the asteroid will reach a magnitude luminosity of 10, so it should be observable to astronomers with telescopes."

For $299,000 you could buy the house where Bruce Springsteen wrote "Born to Run." It looks like a dump prone to flooding every time it rains, but it's a block-and-a-half from the Jersey shore beach.

New York Post: "During his time in the White House, President Richard Nixon — pug-nosed, jowly, irascible, charmless-yet-devoted husband to Pat — was known to awkwardly hit on middle-aged female staffers. In 'The Last of the President’s Men' (Simon & Schuster), veteran journalist Bob Woodward quotes Alexander Butterfield, Nixon’s deputy assistant, about the commander-in-chief’s sad seduction techniques."

The Washington Post thought it would be great journalism to feature Donald's Digs in their weekend edition.  You'll be happy to know that Trump's taste runs to the gaudy & garish. You can take the boy out of the boroughs but you can take the boroughs out of the boy. I'd call Donald's style Early Modern Lottery Winner. Here's a sampling:

... There's much more where that came from. Ugh. Here, by contrast, is the study in Michael Bloomberg's New York City pad. Bloomberg is quite a few $$BB richer than Trump.

CW: I've completely ignored the buzz about the film "Steve Jobs," so this was welcome:

... Sharon Shetty in Slate: "As the latest attempt to mine every last bit of meaning from the life of Apple’s late founder, Danny Boyle and Aaron Sorkin’s Steve Jobs will probably make lots of money and spark lots of debate. For those preemptively exhausted by that debate, there’s Conan O’Brien’s less controversial take on a tech biopic: Michael Dell":

AND contributor D. C. Clark was kind enough to remind us of Eva Cassidy:

Contact the Constant Weader

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The Commentariat -- July 22, 2012

My column in the New York Times eXaminer is titled "The Meaning of Tragedy." The NYTX front page is here.

Jordy Yager & Mike Lillis of The Hill: "A handful of Democrats are pressing for tougher gun laws in the wake of the Colorado movie theater shootings that left 12 people dead." ...

... "Blood on Their Hands." New York Daily News Editors: "Through their inaction and their silence, Obama and Romney have fallen into line with all those who enabled Holmes to take hold of that AR-15 and will enable others to do so in the future unless America's political leaders develop the courage to fight to save lives."

... The Onion: "Americans across the nation confirmed today that, unfortunately, due to their extreme familiarity with the type of tragedy that occurred in a Colorado movie theater last night, they sadly know exactly how the events following the horrific shooting of 12 people will unfold. While admitting they 'absolutely hate' the fact they have this knowledge, the nation's 300 million citizens told reporters they can pinpoint down to the hour when the first candlelight vigil will be held, roughly how many people will attend, how many times the county sheriff will address the media in the coming weeks, and when the town-wide memorial service will be held."

James Asher of McClatchy News: "... reporters from The New York Times, Washington Post, Bloomberg and others are agreeing to give government sources the right to clear and alter quotes as a prerequisite to granting an interview. To be clear, it is the bureau's policy that we do not alter accurate quotes from any source. And to the fullest extent possible, we do not make deals that we will clear quotes as a condition of interviews."

New York Times Editors: "A health care system owned and managed by Alaska's native people has achieved astonishing results in improving the health of its enrollees while cutting the costs of treating them."

Pam Martens of AlterNet: "As the U.S. grapples with intractable wealth disparity and the related ills of unemployment and recession, we need to understand that [the LIBOR scandal] was not merely a few rascals rigging some esoteric index in London. This was an institutionalized wealth transfer system on an almost unimaginable scale." CW: what's important about Martens' piece -- which I found a bit difficult to follow -- is not how they did it but to whom they did it.

Matt Taibbi writes favorably about "a plan to allow local governments to take on the problem of neighborhoods blighted by toxic home loans and foreclosures through the use of eminent domain." CW: when Joe Nocera wrote a column backing the plan, I was immediately skeptical. Taibbi raises the same questions I had, but ultimately decides that since Barack Obama is no FDR, the plan at hand might be the best solution available.

Jeremy Roebuck of the Philadelphia Inquirer: "The iconic statue of late Pennsylvania State University head football coach Joe Paterno will be removed from its spot outside of the campus' football stadium, university president Rodney Erickson said in a statement Sunday." AP story here. ...

... CW: Erickson showed no sensitivity whatsoever to the advice of Maureen Dowd, who writes in today's Times, "... I’d leave it up. But I'd put up another darkly alluring statue behind Paterno, whispering in his ear: Mephistopheles."

Andrew Goldman of the New York Times interviews Terry Gross. Short & funny. Includes penis joke.

Presidential Race

Who's "Un-American" Now? Michael Tomasky of the Daily Beast: "... the patriotism party nominated a man who has for a quarter-century practiced a brand of capitalism that respects no known flag or borders. He ran a company that created some jobs but sent others overseas, he finagled himself a way to get paid a lot of money for doing (by his own admission) no work for a few years, and he appears to have retained a battery of lawyers to help ensure that he pays a far lower tax rate than the working people he's trying to whip into a state of fear about Obama. And there's only one reason people have Swiss bank accounts, and it's to avoid making their otherwise mandated contributions to the national treasury." ...

... Why Those Offshore Accounts of Mitt's Matter. John McKinnon of the Wall Street Journal: "The Tax Justice Network's report estimates that unreported offshore wealth held in tax havens has reached at least $21 trillion, and possibly as much as $32 trillion. [CW: as far as I can tell, the estimate represents wealth from all countries, not just the U.S.] That wealth means that the problem of inequality in wealth and income is actually worse than suspected, the group says. It also means that many countries are losing out on tax revenue that could go a long way toward alleviating their national fiscal problems, the report's authors suggest. The largest previous estimate of the problem -- also by Tax Justice Network, in 2005 -- was about $11.5 trillion, the report says."

Matea Gold & Melanie Mason of the Los Angeles Times: "President Obama's sharp turn to the offensive against GOP challenger Mitt Romney last month came at a steep cost: nearly $58 million."

Charles Johnson of Little Green Footballs: Although the Romney campaign denies it, it appears it is buying Twitter followers. At any rate, the graph of followers for his feed "looks like a hockey stick," with a huge uptick over the past few days. "If you look at all these [new] followers, they seem to have major trouble with spelling simple English words, have names that sometimes seem to be random assortments of syllables, and have no (or very few) followers themselves. At the current rate, he's adding about 10,000 followers every hour." Some fairly hilarious commentary @ #MoreFakeMitt

Right Wing World

Godless Thugs! Brian Tashman of Right Wing Watch: "Fred Jackson, the American Family Association's news director, while discussing the Colorado movie theater shooting today said that liberal Christian churches and liberal media helped contribute to violent incidents by supposedly deemphasizing the fear of God and the Bible."

News Ledes

Washington Post: 'Herbert Vogel, a retired New York postal worker who, with his wife, Dorothy, created one of the world's most unlikely -- and most significant -- collections of modern art, then bequeathed much of it to the National Gallery of Art, died July 22 at a nursing home in New York City. He was 89." CW: a remarkable story.

CBS News: "CBS News has learned that the NCAA will announce what a high-ranking association source called 'unprecedented' penalties against both the Penn State University football team and the school.... NCAA President Mark Emmert will make the announcement Monday morning at 9 a.m. at the organization's headquarters in Indianapolis."

Denver Post: "Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper [D] Sunday expressed skepticism that tougher gun laws would have stopped suspected gunman James Eagan Holmes from unleashing 'terrorist' acts against 70 people in an Aurora movie-theater."

AP: "A federal law enforcement official says the semi-automatic assault rifle used in the deadly Colorado movie theater shooting jammed during the attack." ...

... AP: "The shooting suspect accused in a deadly rampage inside a Colorado theater planned the attack with 'calculation and deliberation,' police said Saturday, receiving deliveries by mail that authorities believe armed him for battle and were used to rig his apartment with dozens of bombs. Meanwhile, new details about 24-year-old James Holmes emerged, including summer jobs the suspect held in Southern California as a camp counselor and as an intern at a prominent research institute." ...

... AP: "... President Barack Obama will travel Sunday to Colorado to comfort distraught families of those gunned down in a minute and a half of real-life horror at a midnight movie showing."

Washington Post: "Heavy clashes rocked Aleppo, Syria's largest city and commercial capital, for a second day on Saturday as thousands streamed across the border into neighboring Lebanon to escape widespread fighting in the country." ...

... Guardian: "An activist group claims that more than 2,750 people have been killed in Syria so far this month, bringing the death toll since the conflict began to more than 19,000."

Reader Comments (12)

Marie, your NYTX article on the Colorado shootings was the best description of the reality I have read. Your assessment of our minds tells it all. We have an incredible capacity for hiding. An article in the Sunday Times (We’re All Climate-Change Idiots) tells a very similar story. The best proof of this is the comments from Fred Jackson of the American Family Association that says this is his god's retribution. Apparently the same god who spends his time watching Tim Tebow play football rather than save the 6 million children who starve to death every year. If the lawyer representing the killer cannot make an insanity defense maybe he can claim he was doing god's work. You know the god who gets a kick out of murdering a six year old child.
The end really is coming and we can thank our minds for making it happen.

July 21, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterMarvin Schwalb

Marie, your latest essay in the NYTimes Examiner is a breath of fresh air. Thank you.

In it you quoted Romney as saying "“When it comes to protecting the Second Amendment, I do not support any new gun laws including any new ban on semi-automatic firearms,” he said in late December 2007. Today he opposes “adding more laws and regulations that do nothing more than burden law-abiding citizens….”"

At no time have I read of or listened to a person who has stated his/her opposition to banning weapons made solely for killing the most people/animals in the least amount of time asked of the person 'Why?'

What on earth is their reasoning for allowing these WMD to be made for any purpose other than armed conflict at the government level much less allowing them to be sold to anyone with the means to pay for them or the wherewithal to steal them.

As an aside, I find in this case the use of the word 'burdened' by new laws cynical.

Maggy Holman

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterMaggy Holman

Any attempt to control firearms in any way is a lose, lose, The power of the NRA is absolute and will remain so for a long time. The NRA destroys all opposition and most politicians are justly afraid of it. As Gail Collins said yesterday, there will come a time when the public will change attitudes. As Gail pointed out, it took a long time to get women the power to vote. It was inevitable as is the change of attitudes and the failure of the NRA.
Unfortunately, many people may die in the interim.

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterCarlyle

Re: Marie's excellent piece in NYTX this morning: Using the classical definition of the word "tragedy" perhaps the real fallen hero of this tale is the country itself. Once portrayed in black and white films as the proud symbol of high standards and patriotic zeal, one got teary eyed knowing how strong and good a country can be. One dared not look too deeply into the underbelly.

If more than half of the populace is against any kind of gun control then our politicians aren't going to risk pushing for it––kind of like a kiss of death for them––only when your seat is safe , evidently, can you stick your neck out and do what's good for the country rather than what's good for you.

In 2005 there was a cable series called "Commander in Chief" starring Gena Davis as the first female president of the U.S. It depicted this woman as a president who, wonder of wonders, actually ran the country the way it should be run––for the people even though her decisions would hurt her chances for reelection. It only ran for two seasons which is a shame. It gave us a glimpse of what it could be like. My country tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing–––sadly and quietly.

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterPD Pepe

P.S. But what a lift to read Matt Taibbi's article––innovative ideas in the making to deal with the housing debacle. This is good news!

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterPD Pepe

I bought my first gun, a Smith & Wesson .38 , at the age of 14 (perfectly legal in 1950's Oregon). So I'm not totally against gun ownersip. That said, can anyone rationally tell me why anyone ouside the military or law enforcement needs an assault rifle? Or a 100 round magazine for it? I read apologists who say it wasn't an assaualt rifle since it couldn't be fired full automatic. As a combat veteran, I can tell you that firing one shot at a time can do a lot of damage. Besides, the M16/AR15 is almost impossible to fire accuately on full auto. As to the argument that if some people in the crowd had been armed-- Obviously, Holmes had thought of that, a gas cloud, wearing black and body armor, a gas mask. People who fantasize about taking on a shooter forget that bullets go both ways. It's hard enough to coordinate trained soldiers without having a bunch of untrained civilians firing wildly in the dark. All the NRA wants to do is sell more guns. That's one of the reasons I disassociated from the NR A many years ago. We need stricter gun control and we need it now!

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterBarbarossa

I've been following your blog for several years now (it's usually the first thing I look at every day), but this is my first time commenting. Thanks for your excellent piece in NYTX on our ongoing gun violence "tragedy". I thought I might add to your mention of Aristotle's calling the tragic flaw hamartia that the New Testament, composed in Greek several hundred years after the time of Aristotle, uses the same word to mean "sin". In regards to gun control, there seems to be plenty of sin to go around.

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterDavidD

It is difficult to get exact comparison data but the following numbers from 2005 get the picture. EU population 500 million, number of murders 4743. US population 310 million, number of murders about 17,000. Of the 17,000 more than 12,000 were done by guns.
In a study quoted by a PolitiFact evaluation, "Researchers determined that the rate of homicides with guns in the U.S. was 4.1 per 100,000 people; the same rate combining the 22 other countries was 0.2 per 100,000 in 2003. The rate of homicides using guns in the U.S. was 19.5 times the rate of the other countries".

In summary, we are truly exceptional!

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterMarvin Schwalb

The idea, floated regularly by NRA boot lickers and Fox semi-literates, that if we all had guns mass killings would not be possible, is back once again. Had that been the case in Aurora, everyone in the audience would have whipped out their peacemakers and made Swiss cheese out of the shooter. A few dead, maybe, no big deal, but no mass murder.

Pure, unadulterated puerile fantasy.

Seriously? This is the sort of NRA wanking material passed along by imbeciles who have never had to fire a weapon at another human being. Professionally trained men and women in the armed forces and police departments routinely report difficulty doing this, especially the first time. It's one thing to shoot at a stationary target, but as Barbarossa points out, quite another when that target is moving and shooting back at you.

Gun crazed states like Arizona should be an excellent test for such a crackpot theory. Arizona boasts the most permissive gun laws (none even worth mentioning, actually) in the country. You can carry concealed weapons pretty much anywhere and no one can say boo.

But when Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot and other innocent bystanders slaughtered by a gunman last year at a public gathering, how many Arizonans drew down on the killer? How many did a Keanu Reeves and slung back their black dusters to pull out their own semi-automatic killing machines to let the bastard have it right between the eyes, blowing away the gunsmoke before holstering their weapon?

You all know the answer.

I don't know if anyone in that crowd actually was armed, but if that nusto theory didn't work in Arizona, where most everyone is already armed, where will it work. But Arizona is just like it was in the Old West, right?

Uhhh....not really.

You see, in the 19th century in places like Arizona, where most EVERYONE was armed--just like that NRA wet dream--municipal officials, and most citizens, realized just how crazy nuts dangerous it was and most towns had "No Carry" laws (unlike the current drive for a "Must Carry" law). Weapons were checked at the sheriff's office in many towns. The idea of people having ready access to deadly weapons, especially drunk people in bars, with which to settle the smallest disputes, was considered insane.

But not today.

Today, the NRA and their running dog lackeys in congress, smirk at mass killings and laugh at anyone who thinks they can point to such public horrors and as a way to challenge hurt complete control.

I'd like to believe that Gail Collins is right.

But without someone to at least start that struggle, the dead and injured in Colorado will just be 70 or so more notches on the NRA bed post. Plenty more to come.

Gunsmoke hovering over American cities is their most fervent dream.

And if a few (thousand) people have to die, well, they just use the same excuse George Zimmerman did.

It was god's will that those people died.

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterakhilleus

I find it interesting that the NY Daily News opines (linked above) that "Obama, Mitt and the NRA" have "blood on their hands." Oh really? The NRA certainly does have blood on its hands and every other inch of its corporate body (is it feeling pain over the horrific event?). After all, this lobby group for the gun industry has done more than anyone else to assure that America has the weakest gun regulation in the advanced world.
Romney? Well, as the article points out, he enthusiastically got in line and joined the NRA at the beginning ofl his run for the presidency. He not only joined it, but has made it a point to highlight his agreement with the NRA positions. In April of this year, Romney addressed their national convention. Accordiing to a contemporaneous article in the Yahoo news, "He delivered a speech broadly attacking President Obama for failing to protect Americans' economic, religious and personal freedoms-- highlighting gun owners in that final attack.
'We need a President who will stand up for the rights of hunters, sportsmen, and those who seek to protect their home and family," Romney said. "President Obama has not; I will.' "
Meanwhile, the NRA has caused millions of guns and rounds of ammo to be sold just on the strength of the argument that it "knows" that in his heart Obama will tighten gun laws in the future. Heck, thousands of people have obtained carry permits just as a reaction to the NRA scare tactics. So the President assuredly was aware that ANY statement he made encouraging tighter regulation would just be used to further the sales of weaponry. That truly put him in an untenable position.
On the other hand, it is a sign of progress that a conservative rag like the News is at least recognizing the need for stricter gun laws. One would hope it is a harbinger of things to come on that score.

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterVictoria D.

Conspsirecy: (sp) Sorry, can't remember the correct
spelling--sixty years out of school. Anyway, I'm waiting for the
gun lobby to come up with the reason we have all of these shootings
every few months. I have a theory that they will say this is being
done by the left (Obama and CIA operatives) to make the NRA
look bad (worse?) Read some blogs today (too many to recall)
claiming that there are training camps in Arizona, Colorado
and Texas where these mass murderers are trained by the CIA.
On call by the opponents of NRA to make then look bad in the
eyes of all of us little people who have no say or no guns.

July 22, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterforrest morris

@JJG. Thanks for your input on this. It's Florida. We gotsa lotsa windows, especially in houses like mine, which was built before A/C. (I didn't count the 4 in the attic, which I had replaced at another time, nor the ones in the basement, which are still the same ole same ole).

July 23, 2012 | Registered CommenterThe Constant Weader
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