The Wires

The Ledes

Monday, September 15, 2014.

Washington Post: "Thomas H. Boggs Jr., who sat for decades at the epicenter of Washington legal, business and political circles as the city’s marquee name in lobbying and political fund-raising, died Sept. 15 at his home in Chevy Chase. He was 73. The cause was an apparent heart attack, said his sister, the broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts."

AP: "Oscar Pistorius is free to compete for South Africa again, as long as his running doesn't go against the ruling of the judge. Pistorius, who is to be sentenced next month after being found guilty in the negligent killing of his girlfriend, could compete at any time because the South African Olympic committee has no regulations preventing someone with a criminal record from representing the country."

Public Service Announcement

New York Times, September 1: "People who avoid carbohydrates and eat more fat, even saturated fat, lose more body fat and have fewer cardiovascular risks than people who follow the low-fat diet that health authorities have favored for decades, a major new study [financed by the N.I.H.] shows."

New York Times, August 15: "The Food and Drug Administration has approved Avastin — made by Genentech, a unit of the Swiss drug maker Roche — for a new use against late-stage cervical cancer, the seventh indication for the biotech drug, which had global sales of $6.25 billion last year."

White House Live Video
September 16

1:30 pm ET: Vice President Biden speaks at the Legal Services Corporation conference

4:05 pm ET: President Obama speaks at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention in Atlanta, Ga.

If you don't see the livefeed here, go to WhiteHouse.gov/live.

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** CW: The best, most provocative piece of writing in the "news" today is A. O. Scott's piece in the New York Times Magazine on "The Death of Adulthood in American Culture." If you don't watch a lot of TV & never see stupid movies, you will struggle with Scott's exemplary references. You may not accept all of his premises, & I think he falls short on defining "adulthood" (though maybe, like pornography, we're supposed to recognize it when we see it.). ...

... Adam Sternbergh responds in New York.

Jeff Weiss, in the New York Times, profiles comedian Bill Maher, who is in the midst of a schtick aimed to defeat the U.S.'s worst Congressperson. You would be a good idea to read Weiss's piece with A. O. Scott's essay in mind. Maher (& even Weiss, who -- in ticking off "bad things" about Maher -- never mentions Maher's offensive attitudes about women) is a fine example of Scott's thesis.

Guardian: "Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge are expecting their second child, the royal family said on Monday morning. The announcement was made from Clarence House on Twitter.... The Duchess of Cornwall is suffering from acute morning sickness, as she did with her first pregnancy, and is being treated by doctors at her apartments in Kensington Palace."

Washington Post: "After less than a year at the top of Politico’s masthead, veteran New York Times editor Rick Berke has resigned as the publication’s executive editor.... Friction had been on display in the newsroom almost from the beginning of his tenure. Berke, according to several current and former Politico employees, tried to impose some of the values of the world he came from — where multiple editors might weigh in, demand multiple drafts, and shape bigger, more ambitious stories — on Politico’s fast-moving, reporter-driven newsroom."

 

Jimmy Fallon & Maroon 5 singer & Voice judge Adam Levine stage a "musical impressions-off." This clip, from a show that aired this week (September 2), already has more than 8MM hits:

New York Times: "The jilted lover of President François Hollande of France has written a tell-all book about her days as France’s onetime unofficial first lady and of her version of events that led the couple to separate after the president was exposed as having an affair by a French gossip magazine. The book by Valérie Trierweiler, 49, who separated from Mr. Hollande in January, describes how news of the affair pushed her to the edge. She acknowledges that she 'cracked' and attempted suicide by trying to overdose on sleeping pills when she learned of Mr. Hollande’s affair with an actress, Julie Gayet.... The book drew a barrage of criticism for revealing secrets about the president, whose office embodies the nation and is rarefied like that of a monarch."

Washington Post: "Apple said that its iCloud systems have not been breached Tuesday and that thieves stole celebrity photos from Apple accounts by targeting individuals, rather than by breaking into the company's infrastructure."

Gabrielle Bluestone of Gawker claims she has compiled "everything we know about the alleged celeb nude 'trading ring' & leak." CW: I'll take her word for it, though I should warn you her post does not include any nude pix. My advice: If you wanna be in pictures, but you don't want photos of your naked self published on celebrity Websites, don't upload the pictures onto the Internets. There be hackers. 

... Marisa Guthrie of the Hollywood Reporter interviews Jon Stewart, mostly on the making of his film "Rosewater," which is based on the arrest & incarceration of journalist Maziar Bahari in Iran in 2009.

AP: Actors "Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt were married Saturday in the French hamlet of Correns, a spokesman for the couple says. Jolie and Pitt wed in a small chapel in a private ceremony attended by family and friends at Provence's Chateau Miraval. In advance of the nondenominational civil ceremony, Pitt and Jolie obtained a marriage license from a local California judge. The judge also conducted the ceremony in France."

No, he isn't. -- David Chase, in answer to the question, "Is Tony dead?" ...

... However, it's more complicated than that. Follow-up story, with Chase's response to the original Vox story by Margaret Nochimson, here.

Todd VanDerWerff of Vox discusses the final scene of "The Sopranos":

New York Times: "The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards was a win for broadcast and cable television, which earned numerous awards as the digital gate-crasher Netflix was nearly shut out. AMC’s 'Breaking Bad' scored big on Monday night, winning a total of five awards, including its second consecutive prize for outstanding drama series. The crime drama, about a high school teacher who receives a diagnosis of lung cancer and starts selling crystal meth with a former student, concluded its final season." Here's the L.A. Times' coverage.

New Yorker illustration.

The New Yorker has opened up its archives for the summer. An excellent opportunity to get in on some fabulous reading.

 

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Pennsylvania

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NBC News projects that Pennsylvania Republican Pat Toomey will win the Senate seat.

NBC News projects that Pennsylvania Republican Tom Corbett will win the governorship.

President Obama spoke at a Democratic National Committee event in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, late this morning. AP Update: "President Barack Obama implored voters on Saturday to resist a Republican tide, warning that if the GOP prevails in Tuesday's midterm elections all the progress of his first two years in office "'can be rolled back.'"

One way for Congress to avoid Constitutional challenges to legislation: just defund the Supreme Court! What a concept! It's the brainchild of 4th Congressional District Republican nominee Keith Rothfus. You can't make this stuff up.

October 20: Pennsyvania Senate candidates Joe Sestak & Pat Toomey debate. Watch it on C-SPAN. Philadelphia Inquirer story here.

Politico, October 11: "Vice President Biden mentioned Karl Rove’s name a half-dozen times at a fundraiser in Scranton, Pa., on Monday, charging that the GOP strategist is raising money from 'shady sources' to attack Democrats.... Biden told Rove to 'tell us where that money is coming from,' and he filed a similar complaint against the Chamber of Commerce...."

Ben Smith finds "the dumbest use of the term 'race card' yet." (Smith's comment is here.) CW: yes, it is. If anyone played racial politics here, it was certainly the accuser.

New York Times: Rahm Emanuel, "President Obama’s chief of staff, used former President Bill Clinton as an intermediary to see if Representative Joe Sestak would drop out of a Senate primary if given a prominent, but unpaid, advisory position, people briefed on the matter said Friday." ...

     ... NEW: Here's a pdf of White House Counsel Robert Bauer's legal assessment that no "improper conduct" occurred....

     ... This statement from Joe Sestak confirms White House's version of events....

    ... NEWER: Here's a comprehensive Washington Post story.

Definition of Grandstanding. Jake Tapper of ABC News: "In a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder..., all seven Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee 'urge the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate Congressman Joe Sestak's claim that a White House official offered him a job to induce him to exit the Pennsylvania Senate primary race against Senator Arlen Specter.'" Here's a pdf of the letter....

     ... Or, as Steve Benen puts it, "It's hard to overstate how incredibly dumb this is."

The (Allentown, Pennsylvania) Morning Call: "The White House and Joe Sestak should explain what happened with the alleged job offer, Gov. Ed Rendell said Wednesday...."

Peter Baker of the New York Times: "For three months, the White House has refused to say whether it offered a job to Representative Joe Sestak to get him to drop his challenge to Senator Arlen Specter in a Pennsylvania Democratic primary, as Mr. Sestak has asserted.... Perhaps unsurprisingly, the 'trust us' response from the White House has not exactly put the matter to rest." ...

... Related. Steve Benen says the brouhaha over the "Sestak Offer" is pointless; whatever transpired, unless money changed hands, no crime was committed & -- sorry, Republicans -- there's no scandal....

... Politico: on "Meet the Press," Rep. Joe Sestak confirms that "someone" in the White House offered him an administration job if he would quit the Pennslyvania Democratic Senate primary race. With video. Here's a better video:

... New York Times: "The White House appeared to confirm Sunday that the Obama administration had some kind of conversations with Representative Joe Sestak, the Pennsylvania Democrat who was challenging Senator Arlen Specter, but asserted that the conversations were not inappropriate." ...

     ... The Hill Update, May 24: "Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner (N.Y.) called on the White House on Monday to detail conversations it allegedly had with Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) to try to convince him to drop his Senate bid."

The Hill, May 19: "Congressman-elect Mark Critz (D-Pa.) will be sworn-in at a ceremony on Capitol Hill Thursday." Critz won a special election to replace his former boss Jack Murtha, who died this spring.

"Nothing makes friends like winning." New York Times: "Shortly after Representative Joe Sestak won an improbable victory Tuesday over Senator Arlen Specter in Pennsylvania’s Democratic Senate primary, President Obama called Mr. Sestak to congratulate him. The president pledged his full support."

AP: "An aide to the late Democratic Rep. John Murtha won a special election to fill the final months of his boss's term - a nationally watched contest considered a potential bellwether for this fall's midterm election. In a tight race to the end, Mark Critz brushed back a strong challenge from Tim Burns."

Philadelphia Inquirer: "Rep. Joe Sestak, riding a call for 'new blood' in Washington, defeated incumbent Arlen Specter in the Democratic U.S. Senate primary Tuesday, ending the career of the longest serving senator in Pennsylvania history."